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Biocommunication Sign-Mediated Interactions between Cells and Organisms

Another book from Hubby Dearest

Embryogenesis Explained

Gordon&Seckbach2016 Biocommunication Table of Contents

Dick’s latest book published by World Scientific as coeditor with Joseph Seckbach is now off to the printers. It includes a chapter on the Cybernetic Embryo which is an expansion of the idea in the final chapter of our book Embryogenesis Explained. The book will be out about December 2016.

Table of Contents:

Part I Theoretical Approaches

1. Molecular Biocommunication by Alexei A. Sharov

2. Key Levels of Biocommunication by Guenther Witzany

3. Zoosemiotics, Typologies of Signs and Continuity Between Humans and Other Animals by Dario Martinelli

4. Communication as an Artificial Process by Massimo Negrotti

5. Cybernetic Embryo by Richard Gordon and Robert Stone

6. Superfast Evolution via Trans and Interspecies Biocommunication by Ille C. Gebeshuber and Mark O. Macqueen

7. Channel Capacity and Rate Distortion in Amino Acid Networks by Boaz Tamir and Avner Priel

8. Communication Languages and Agents in Biological Systems by Subhash Kak

Part II Experimental Approaches

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Little House on the Prairie – Update Exterior Painting

I promised myself that I would not start doing any more renovations or additions or purchase anything else for any other projects until I used up all the paint I had in the house from last year and the garage was repainted to match the house. (this has saved me a lot of money this summer.) As it happens, I will need to buy one more small can of the lighter bright yellow but its done! There is a small section that needs a second coat. I still have to do the trim, and the doors (my next painting effort) but the main part is done. Doing the garage was much easier than the house because there was no sanding, scraping, bare wood or peeling paint. This was basically a brighten and refresh job so the garage matches the house. What a huge job this has been even though this is a tiny house. I hope I don’t need to do it again anytime soon. The staid proper and rather boring old before colour is shown below. You can’t see what terrible shape the old paint was in before either.

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Of course, forcing myself to not buy anything until the old project stuff has been used up has not stopped me from dreaming about the next project. This is my tentative indoor colour scheme for once I have all the trim and other exterior stuff completed.

Kitchen Color

 

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Little House on the Prairie Update = More New Windows!

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Does anything update a refresh an old house the way brand new windows do? I couldn’t be more excited about this bit of updating and refreshing. We left the job to the pros because some things are too much for us as do it yourselfers. Last year when we moved in one window was rotted and in terrible shape and needed immediate replacing. The others were in poor shape but we had so many expenses getting into the house that we decided to wait. One thing we are trying not to do is create any debt as we fix up this old house. This year’s new windows were a bear partly due to the need to remove and replace more rotting wood under the sill and do a lot of resealing where old calking dried up, split and fell out, but we still got three more high quality, locally made, window upgrades for under $2000. (That no doubt seems like a lot to folks from the south but we have learned from bitter cold experience not to put southern windows on a northern house!) We paid extra to get really nice windows that are designed to be unhooked and swung in so they can be cleaned from the inside, with high quality easy pop in, pop out, type screens and above all the high insulation value required for our very very cold winters. These windows will be able to handle a ferocious wind blowing in when it’s -40F/-40C without even a cool spot or frosting the even the corner of a pane. We have two windows to go, the front living room and kitchen one but we already had Mr. Terreck do the measurements and that will be next spring’s major expense.

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Galley Proofs

Embryogenesis Explained

If you have published a book you know there is one last peek before it goes out generally known as galley proofs. This is a set of proofs that are in the final form where you get one last chance to cross an ‘i’ or dot a ‘t’ and make sure all the previous corrections from the proofs have been added correctly. You can’t make any major changes, even one as small as adding a sentence or moving a paragraph without causing a major problem for the publisher and adding weeks to months before the book is published. Today those galley proofs arrived for us to look at. One last chance to make sure it is all perfect and then you have to let it go and let it stand as it is.

So exciting!

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Does Anyone Remember “In Season”? On making relish.

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When I was a little girl I recall wanting to have a fresh peach so badly the craving had me near tears. It was February and peaches were simply not to be had in Canada. I just had to do without. Peaches were only available in the late summer and early fall when big trucks came labeled with BC Fruits. The closest you could get to a fresh peach outside of their appointed season was to eat peaches in a can.

There is a Jewish tradition of each Sabbath and holiday finding something that is a treat to eat that has just come into season and to say a special blessing as you eat it for the first time in the year. I have noticed that it has become increasingly difficult to find something like that because with our globalized world there is very little that is no longer  available all year. I can always find peaches in the grocery store because peaches come from South America and cold storage has extended the harvest year. I don’t eat canned peaches anymore because I don’t want the sugar in the syrup they are canned in. Yet I find I don’t eat peaches very often anymore either.

Now that I am gardening again, the cycle of the gardening season is back in my life. I planted snow peas, edible pod peas and mid season peas which require shucking. The snow peas were ready first and we had three glorious meals of snow peas before they were all gone. The edible pod peas came next and we feasted on those and they were so delightful we didn’t miss snow peas. The midseason peas arrived and were so delicious we found ourselves eating them straight from the pod. It just didn’t seem worth cooking them. The midseason peas are nearly done but it doesn’t matter because the garden has begun producing green and yellow beans. The corn I planted has just sent up the pollination stems so I expect by the time the beans are finished, we will have fresh corn. And so, through the garden cycle we have a succession of wonderful food to eat but each one is only there a little time to enjoy and then it is done. It is a lot easier to find something for the Sabbath blessing when you have your own garden.

Have we lost or gained by the factory food that is available year round? I suppose in some ways it is always nice to be able to have a peach anytime you want. And yet this has made peaches common place and there is no longer the wonder of a fresh peach in season. And so I am left to wonder, is it that we are accustomed to having peaches all the time that has made them ho hum? Or is it that the factory farm methods that allow mass produced peaches year round have robbed us of taste? Are our palettes dulled or is the fruit itself dull? I suspect the latter. On our trip to BC in fall a few years ago, I happened to drive through a place selling peaches right off the tree. Eating a fresh peach in season directly from the orchard, makes you realize how bland and plain the store bought peaches, readily available year around, actually are. I just don’t like those peaches very much.

In the old days, everything was seasonal and there was always the long winter to fear when no airplane and ships could bring bounty from the southern hemisphere. Those long dark times of potential ever present hunger meant our forebears never took for granted anything grown in summer. You had to put food by for winter and no one would ever waste food by allowing it to rot. Mothers encouraged children to eat more than they should because that layer of fat acquired just before winter might mean making it through the winter when times were lean. If you had an excess of something you put it by anyway because you could always trade it or sell it to someone less fortunate in winter.

Relish is one of those foods invented to avoid wasting food and provide food in winter when food was otherwise scarce. There are at least as many forms of relish as there people who make it and I think perhaps even more because no two relishes made from your own garden produce are ever exactly the same. A traditional relish is put together with vinegar and sugar and salt to preserve it until winter. It is cooked to sterilize it when it is put by so moulds and bacteria don’t eat it in the meantime. A short boiling water bath fixes the seal. Very little else is constant about relish. I hate relish myself but my husband loves it.

Relish is designed to be made from the excess of the garden so it doesn’t go to waste. Too many cucumbers to eat now? Some green tomatoes the slugs munched on that will rot not ripen? Not a problem because these are the staple ingredients of a good relish. And why not throw in the leftover raw store bought corn from three cobs left in the fridge after the big feast, some zucchini tops from zucchinis where blossom rot has ruined the ends, onions accidentally pulled too soon while weeding can be chopped and added, raw cabbage from the end of the head, a bit of horseradish root the neighbour dropped off, and a few hot peppers just starting in the garden but knocked off while hunting peas. Some judicious cutting and soon the pot is full enough to make relish even if there is not enough of any one thing to do anything else.

My husband likes his relish spicey so I used a hot dog relish recipe that called for spice and included turmeric and red pepper and mustard. He tasted it while it bubbled in the pot and pronounced it perfect. And now what was potential garden waste is six jars of very fine hot dog relish. My husband laughed and said for him it is a two year supply. But that’s all right. At some point this winter he will open a jar of hot dog relish and memories of summer will come with the taste and smell and it will all be worth it. And because I made it exactly the way he likes it, instead of the way some large company designed it aimed at the lowest common denominator, chances are it will not last two years. I can’t help but think my great grandmother would be proud of me for growing my own food and using up garden snips and bits instead of just purchasing a jar of relish from the store.

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Poor Man’s Jewels

My daughter got a freebie package of plant seeds from Honey Nuts Cheerios. They are on a campaign to save the bees. Bees in Manitoba seem to be doing very well. We have had some trouble with mites and colony collapse but there are vast areas of Manitoba woodland, especially in the central regions around The Pas where it seems like every farm has a bee keeper on it. Locally grown honey is readily available along every highway. We have had continuous bees visiting our home. They probably come from our neighbour’s place which is about 2 kms from us and I have been teasing him saying I deserve a cut of his honey for free. When my apple trees were in bloom the trees actually buzzed there were so many honey bees feeding.

I was uncertain exactly what to do with mixed packet of unspecified flower seeds that is somehow supposed to help bees. I think it is probably a gimmick given how many other wildflowers we have, not to mention fruit trees and flowering shrubs and my sunflowers you can see about to bloom as well as the abundant parsley and dill seeds. Still, the seeds were free and from my much loved daughter, so I put them in one row. I have been richly rewarded.

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I have a lovely row of mixed poppies. I love poppies. My Ukranian grandmother grew poppies from the old country for their medicinal purposes until one day the RCMP showed up and made her dig them up and promise never to grow them again. I’m not sure what kind of poppies these ones are but I suspect a mix of Icelandic and Californian. A seed catalogue I used to order from as a young woman had a slogan calling flowers “Poor Man’s Jewels”. If that is true I now have enough for a queen.

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