Our Fred Crosses the Bridge

Fred

There are dogs and then there are those dogs who have so much character and life that they make an indelible impression on your life and you never will forget them. Fred was such a dog. We got Fred when he was one year old. Our dog Trusty got out and somehow Fred got free and they were both playing in our yard. Fred had been living down the alley tied up outside and he cried and barked constantly. This had been going on for a week or so. Fred’s then owner came by later that day and reported he was not a dog person. He had been at a party out in the country and Fred had been tied up and was barking and the owner said Fred was a huge nuisance and he planned on shooting him. This man decided that was wrong and had taken Fred home with him but he was no dog person and worked long hours and Fred was clearly unhappy tied in his back yard. We agreed to let Fred stay with us until a proper home could be found for him. I was thinking maybe a week.

Fred’s rescuer then backtracked Fred’s history and found Fred had had several one month or less “homes” until he was traced back to the formal adoption by a woman who had taken him from the Winnipeg Humane Society. She was still his formal legal owner but she immediately passed on all of Fred’s assorted original paperwork and a transfer of ownership document. It was quite a bundle. We found out Fred’s official birthday was exactly one week after our Trusty’s. We also found out he had originally come from some place in the USA and was supposedly a purebred Australian Shepherd with AKA papers which was of course utterly preposterous. There is some Aussie in there but he’s no purebred. He had been purchased from a pet shop and then somehow ended up as a puppy running loose on a northern first nations reserve. He was rescued from the reserve as a four month old puppy the day before dog shoot day. Going through his paperwork we discovered Fred had been passed through at least nine owners before coming to us. We took him to our vet. Our vet told Fred that he was one very lucky dog to have landed where he did. We contacted the Winnipeg Humane Society and they were more than happy to have Fred officially transferred to us. It was then we realized Fred had become our dog.

Fred was a delightful fellow but he had no manners. He as too old for puppy class but we started him in obedience classes and he completed all three obedience levels easily. We found he was a food driven dog and would do anything to get treats. Treats were far more important to him than affection and praise. Unlike Trusty he had no interest in agility. This whole leash and behaving thing as strictly about treats.

Fred soon settled right into our household as if he had always been around. We had only one bump. When he first came into the house and spotted one of our then three cats and he charged. I grabbed him and gave him supreme hell and told him in our house cats were part of the pack. I won’t ever forget his face. I’m sure he was thinking “Oh please, it’s a cat. You don’t seriously expect me to treat a cat like a pack member!” However in spite of Fred’s obvious bewilderment of our love of cats he immediately decided the cats were part and parcel of the package and he had an obligation to protect them. He never chased one of our cats even again but he would take joyous delight in chasing strange cats. If any dog or other animal pestered our cats he would ferociously charge out to defend them. His attitude was if he had put up with these damn cats, he was going to make sure no one else was going to get any pleasure or joy out of chasing them either.

Fred had one major behaviour issue. He loved to go roaming. Every chance he would get he would take off and go exploring the area. He had an invariably good sense of direction and he never seemed to get lost. He was also expert at making friends. We put a tag on him with his name and address and our phone number and it also had the name and make of our trailer and that he was from Canada. He would take off and there was no catching him. Eventually he would wander back or someone would contact us to come get him. One time we found him bumming cheese dorritos in a bar. Another time we found him perfectly at home at a family gathering after making off with some spareribs from their barbecue. Once he got away at a music festival and he was “arrested” by security when they caught him helping himself to their hot dogs. Another time Fred was returned riding in a golf cart, after he went visiting a golf course next to our campground. Once we got called by the City of Winnipeg Animal control to report Fred was waiting by the door for them when they arrived to work expecting his free ride home. Fred’s galavants were a constant source of amusement and aggravation. He was the absolute master of sneaking out of a partially closed gate or dashing away at an opportune moment. He pulled this stunt at least once a week. His last run was a few days before his death and he only got a few blocks from home before I caught him. He could no longer outrun me or go far.

Fred’s favourite  thing to do, besides eating, was chasing a ball. He loved the ball. As a young dog my husband would throw the ball with a ball thrower 40 times to wear him out. Over the years the number dropped. In his last few months he could no longer chase the ball because his hips got injured. He would carry the ball instead and if we were at a beach he could fetch the ball as long as he had to swim to it. He loved to swim. He loved going in the canoe too, but he preferred swimming beside the canoe as often as he could.

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Fred playing with two boys he befriended in Georgia. Fred would later save the younger one from drowning and be rewarded with a whole steak. Fred loved kids.

Fred once saved a four year old boy from drowning. We were staying at a campground on a river in Georgia and I was out walking him. A little boy got in over his head and was being carried away. He was floating at his hairline. We adults didn’t notice but Fred did. He charged and tore the leash out of my hand, leaped from a wall into the water and raced to the child going like a motor boat. As soon as he got to the child, the little boy pulled himself up gasping and Fred turned and swam back to the child’s father who was now on his way out. Fred took the child straight to him and met him halfway. That evening the grateful father stopped by with a barbecued steak that was so big it hung over the plate. He asked for permission to give it to Fred. I, of course, gave it to him and a bewildered but delighted Fred had a few moments of heavenly happiness wolfing down this huge steak.

Fred also intervened on four occasions when human predators were out to mug us. He was the sweetest dog and loved everyone but on those four occasions he was transformed into a snarling growling killer dog ready to kill for us. I don’t know if Fred would have actually attacked but the four possible muggers didn’t want to take the chance and left us alone and went searching for easier prey.

Fred and Trusty were inseparable buddies for eleven years. Fred was hubby dearest’s dog and Trusty was mine. The two dog played together, slept together, cuddled together and rarely had even a doggy scrap where one or the other growled and snapped. There were two exceptions. Fred got first dibs on any food unless we forced the situation. Trusty got first dibs on sleeping location. Other than that they were perfect together.

Fred loved kids. Visiting kids meant food and fun. He would play endlessly with them. In addition to ball, one of his favourite games was to try to snatch the water coming out of the hose. He was often totally soaked while kids laughed and laughed as he played with the hose. He never got upset with or snapped at a child. If they got mean or hurt him he would simply shake them off and leave.

At the age of eleven Fred developed a funny black lump on his foot. We took him to the vet and the vet checked him and found several more lumps and bumps. We decided to just remove the lump on his foot since it was interfering with his ability to walk but otherwise do nothing. As time passed the lumps and bumps grew and proliferated but Fred was still happy and enjoying life so we did nothing.

When Trusty passed I was worried Fred would mourn. He didn’t seem to. Dogs live in the moment anyway but Fred even more so than most dogs. When we got the new puppy, Misty, Fred fell head over heels in love and instantly began mentoring her. When he figured out if she went out to do her business they both got treats he made her housebreaking his personal mission and she didn’t have an accident after the first week. He played with her constantly, slept with her cuddled to him, and adored her as much as he had Trusty. He also stole her puppy chow every chance he got.

A week ago Fred started whimpering when he jumped up the stairs into the trailer. He started scratching his belly a lot. He also seemed to be having trouble getting into a comfortable sleeping position. Two nights ago something dramatically changed and it was clear he was in terrible pain. He was awake all night and even the pain killer we had for his occasional back trouble did nothing. He kept looking at me with his big eyes begging me to do something. We took him to a vet that day, one here our friends used and the vet agreed it was time. One of the lumps and bumps had caused his liver to enlarge and it was pressing on his diaphragm and Fred was suffering horribly. I was with Fred when he departed. He was frightened, the pain was bad and he didn’t like the vets handling him so he struggled. I went to him and I held his head and looked into his eyes and talked to him, calming him enough for the vet and the tech to do their thing. As the drug took effect, his eyes filled with relief and gratitude. They said “You did it, you made the pain go away. I knew you would. Thank you.” And then Old Fred was gone.

 

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I am a fan of Lacy J Dalton and my favourite song of hers is Old Dog Blue. Fred knew it was about him and he would come over and put his head on my knee and give me doggy love eyes. I called him Old Fred even when he was a young dog.

When I get to heaven first thing I’ll do is shout

“Hey, Old Fred!”

If there are no dogs in heaven I don’t want to go.

 

Afterword: About a week later I had a vivid dream. I was outside and Fred suddenly came running up, happy, full of life, and young and healthy. I was astonished and said “Fred! What are you doing back here? You’re dead!” Even as I gave him a pat and a greeting, an angel came flying/running to us. “I’m so sorry, I just turned my back for a second and he got away on me.” She snapped on the leash and led Fred off with me laughing. Yup Fred would do that.

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6 thoughts on “Our Fred Crosses the Bridge

  1. Catwoods

    I’m so sorry to read about the loss of your Fred. It’s so difficult to lose a beloved animal. It sounds like Fred did have a long and happy life with you. I hope you find peace and comfort in good memories.

    Liked by 1 person

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  2. G. Masengarb

    I’m so sorry to hear about Fred’s passing. Hard. Praying for comfort for you. Ginny

    On Thu, Jan 11, 2018 at 1:36 PM, Tumbleweeds Tumbling wrote:

    > tumbleweedstumbling posted: ” There are dogs and then there are those dogs > who have so much character and life that they make an indelible impression > on your life and you never will forget them. Fred was such a dog. We got > Fred when he was one year old. Our dog Trusty got out and so” >

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
  3. Forever Alaskan

    What an amazing tale of a truly unique canine! ‘Dog people’ are the best and almost all my good friends share their lives with canines. Fred was the epitome of the quirkiness which so often accompanies an exceptional dog. I am so sorry for your loss! My ‘little’ angel (my 112 pound female Alaskan malamute ‘Anana’) is eight and a half years of age and is suffering from advancing arthritis. She is also a very special canine having become an honorary ‘therapy dog’ at the Sunrise Assisted Living facility I volunteered in for three years before relocating to Alaska. She loves anything on two legs and when I bring the dogs on summer trips into the village come summer our Escape is immediately surrounded by tourists just trying to pet Anana and get their picture taken with her. I hope I do not have to make that ‘quality of life’ call with her but I’m afraid this will come to pass. She’s my baby and my ‘little’ angel and I cannot imagine life without her howls and quirky sense of humor. Thanks so much for sharing Fred’s story!!

    Liked by 1 person

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