Tag Archives: life

Health Update – New Doctor and Polypharmacy

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This month we attended the Grand Ole Kinosota Opry (think Karaoke with a few professional musicians thrown in doing old country favourites) and we had a great time. I snapped this selfie sitting on my husband’s lap.

Yesterday we made yet another trip to Neepawa where, among other things, we saw the new neurologist. Mostly I came away feeling really positive. The new fellow agreed with all the reductions in medication our own family doctor has implemented. Recall my husband was on five different drugs, three of which were to lower his blood pressure. He was having some very nasty side effects. One drug a generic version of lipitor was in the cocktail even though my husband has no issues with high cholesterol or any other lipid issue. His lipid levels were normal. I’m not sure why this drug was included in the cocktail but for three months my husband suffered terrible leg cramps, especially in his thighs, that would wake him in the middle of the night with pain so bad he would literally scream. We were told to stop that drug as soon as the first neurologist heard about it. While the cramps got better right away, it was another two months before the cramps finally stopped completely.

The two extra blood pressure medications had side effects including sleepiness, swollen ankles, sudden drops where his vision would go black, dizziness, inability to tolerate heat, problems with becoming dehydrated, an inability to tolerate even the most mild exercise beyond slow walking, and “The Wall”. “The Wall” being terrible fatigue that came on without warning and required he immediately going to bed, lie down and sleep. Initially, we assumed that The Wall was purely an effect of the suspected stroke. Now I am not so sure all of it was that. Second to go on the cocktail list was a drug called amlodipene, a calcium channel blocker. First, we reduced it by half for two weeks while monitoring his blood pressure and then we got rid of it completely. For the first couple of days after the drug was reduced/removed my husband got some wonky readings including a couple of weird high ones but they soon settled. There was an immediate and very noticeable improvement in just about every measure of my husband’s alertness, ability to tolerate exercise. Plus “The Wall” rather abruptly vanished.

Third to go was the diuretic, hydrochlorothiazide. Again, the same few days of wonky readings and then the readings not only settled down nicely, in fact, they went lower than before. We are now consistently below 140/80 with the majority readings in under 130/80. And much to everyone’s surprise but mine, so did the swollen ankles. Now hydrochlorothiazide is supposed to prevent swollen ankles by draining away excess water but if you read the fine print the pharmacist gives you, it can actually cause higher blood pressure and swollen ankles in some individuals. Another very nice bonus was issues with our love life vanished. I’ll spare you the details but hydrochlorothiazide is renowned for its ability to turn vigorous healthy men into limp noodles. Some people may prefer their men in that state. I am not among them.

My husband is now back to the single blood pressure medication he has been on for the last twelve years, a drug that was prescribed to him by another metabolic specialist after a lot of tests and (I am most annoyed by this part) a trial of both another calcium channel blocker and hydrochlorothiazide. The first was ineffective and the second proved to make things worse, not better for him. So why did no one listen to me when I complained about adding drugs that we already knew didn’t work? I’m just the stupid wife with a PhD in human genetics specializing in metabolic pathways, so what could I possibly know compared to Almighty Doctor? Can you see my eyes rolling so far back in my head I can see my tenth birthday? My only regret is I caved in and let the doctors push me into putting him on these drugs and it took a lot to finally get someone, namely our family doctor, to actually listen to me and agree to try stopping them in a safe supervised way.

The new neurologist did not talk about putting my husband back on any of those drugs. (Much to my relief as I was ready for a fight.) He did explain why my husband needs the anti platelet drug clopidogrel bisulfate (generic form of Plavix.) As long as my husband has this narrowing of his carotid artery the blood is rushing through like rapids through a chasm. Blood can get caught in eddies and swirls that can cause a clot to form. A clot could trigger a stroke. Now I “get” it. However the new neurologist was also specific that when the pseudoanuerysm heals, we can stop the clopidogrel bisulfate. The neurologist says my husband will need to be on baby aspirin for the rest of his life. We’re both fine with that since he’s been on the baby aspirin since he started the high blood pressure medication and he’s tolerating the clopidogrel bisulfate very well.

The neurologist also agreed with the interventional radiologist that a 5-10% chance of having a stroke or even dying while having the stent put in for someone who has no symptoms, means the stent is a bad idea. He also agreed my husband needs to have an MRI to rule out so called “silent strokes”. Silent strokes are very tiny strokes that have a nasty cumulative effect and eventually can cause dementia. The anti platelet medicine should be preventing these silent strokes from happening. Only an MRI will tell for sure. I explained how the doctors in Brandon had decided he could not have an MRI due to some metal in his leg from a bad break many years ago. The interventional radiologist had told us that was nonsense and the new neurologist agreed. At some point, we will get the appointment to go have an MRI. Given this is now elective, that could take a while with Canadian wait times. The new neurologist asked about homocysteine since that is a key factor in many silent strokes, but the previous neurologist had already ruled out high blood homocysteine levels via the blood tests. It was nice he explained the connection between homocysteine and silent stroke as opposed to saying the equivalent of “It’s normal so don’t worry your pretty little head about it.”

I was also very happy to be able to tell the new neurologist that from our perspective, life has pretty much returned to normal. I came away feeling very positive about the longer term as well because this specialist seems to think that eventually the artery will heal and the sword of Damocles hanging over my husband’s inner carotid artery will eventually be gone. June is when we will reassess and we can do it with ultrasound. For now, we carry on as we have been, living normally.

This entire adventure got me thinking about a very common problem with the way we practice medicine. Polypharmacy is a real and dangerous problem. I’m not sure why my husband was sent home with a cornucopia of fives drugs in a messy cocktail that caused him so much trouble. Maybe he needed all that in the early days post carotid artery dissection. Maybe it helped his healing and then once the healing was done, it would have been safely stopped eventually even if I had not fussed so much about it. Maybe he was ‘overmedicated” right from the beginning. We’ll never know. My personal feeling is he was given a standard cocktail of post stroke drugs appropriate for someone with multiple risk factors like diabetes, poor lipid profile, and uncontrolled high blood pressure. No one took into consideration that his supposed stroke was not caused by any of these and two of these drugs had already failed in his past history. Rather, his stroke symptoms was that typical of a much younger person caused by an accident that tore his inner artery.

My advice is one should never just stop the drugs doctors prescribe. However you should question each and every drug as soon as it is prescribed. If you think past history means the drug is not a good idea, say so and keep saying so until the doctor listens. If the doctor won’t listen, find a new doctor. Don’t take glib explanations for the reason for taking the drug. Do take the time to read all the fine print in those sheets the pharmacists hand out. Know exactly what those side effects are and promptly report them to the doctor. Insist on a serious reconsideration of the drug with an eye to deprescribing as soon as the side effects pop up. Wave the pharmacist’s sheet in front of the doctor if you have to, to make the point. Finally, conditions change and you need to review all the drugs you take with an eye to deprescribing at least once a year and certainly whenever a change in your health happens. Always reduce the number of drugs you are on under the supervision of a doctor you are confident with. NEVER just stop taking them on your own. If your doctor is not listening, find another doctor. Doctors are human beings, not minor deities. No one sues them for over prescribing. They only get sued for under prescribing.

On a final note, to be fair, I have two dear friends with complex health issues who are seeing the first neurologist and they think the world of him. They are convinced he saved their lives and they can’t say enough good things about them. I still think the first one was competent. He just wasn’t the right one for us and part of that was his personality (he’s a ‘pat on the head you need to trust me’ type) and I directly and absolutely butted heads with my (I need to know at least as much as you and strive to learn more than you because it’s my problem) personality type. His refusal to listen to me could well be simply because I got his back up. More than one doctor has said I am a difficult patient, or in this case, a difficult wife.

And so that is our update. We are now feeling “back to normal”. Travel outside of Canada is still out of the question due to insurance issues. We are thinking about some camping trips with our travel trailer to places like the Yukon this summer since we are spending the winter here. Wonder of wonders, I am actually enjoying this winter. I think that is because I don’t have to stand and wait for a bus in the extreme cold. If it’s horrible outside I cocoon inside under my electric blanket. I have also been trying winter sports I never had time for when I was working. I discovered I really like curling. The community has been hosting a whole whack of fun events. The farmers are not as busy in winter and folks get sick of being shut inside so fun things tend to happen. We have been to multiple events including one where we won 15 pounds of pickerel. This year is off to a great start!

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Death is so Final.

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This is Argo in his prime. He was a good kitty. He had been abandoned in an apartment when his original humans moved out. It was nearly a month before the landlord arrived to clean up and found this poor frantic dehydrated starving cat. He was adopted by my daughter and her significant other. He had a year and a half of being the darling kitty of a childless couple. We got pictures and updates on every aspect of his life. We tenderly joked that he was their practice baby. They sure loved that cat.

Argo got out in the cold. His human went looking for him immediately but on his way home Argo lost an encounter with an orange Kia. His people did everything they could to save him but after a week (and more than $1000 in vet expenses) it became clear he was suffering and would never recover. They made the hard decision to give him mercy. Argo has moved on to wherever it is good cats go when they die.

For reasons I don’t really get, Argo’s death has hit me very hard. Maybe it is because we also got word this week that my mother-in-law finally lost her long hard battle with dementia and mental illness and passed on at the age of ninety seven. One of my friends who is a recent immigrant from China told me that when someone dies at ninety seven that is a cause for celebration not mourning. I kind of see it. My mother-in-law’s brain had been gone for a long time so her finally passing means death is a friend not an enemy. Now that she has passed everyone else is celebrating her life as if she were a perfect saintly mother and wife, which she certainly was not. When I die, no doubt people will celebrate me as if I were a saint too, even though I am far from it.

Our town has many feral cats. Several people in the town put food out for them. Folks try to find good homes for the ones they can catch. Locals take the babies first because if you can catch a feral cat as a baby you can handle it and get it used to people. Older feral cats cannot normally be tamed. Sometimes an adult cat will approach one of us in the cold desperate for help and then you know they are someone’s pet who was lost or abandoned. The truly feral ones just die. Each winter the feral cat population is dramatically reduced by our bitter cold. There is a lone female feral cat who has taken up residence in our neighbour’s gazebo who has resisted every attempt to catch her and get her in where it is warm. We are all afraid she is going to die soon as temperatures are going to -26C each night now. I watch those feral cats with their frozen off ear tips and they scarred faces and I think how few of them had even one single day as good as Argo had for that year and a half. Life is certainly not fair. Why does there have to be pain and suffering in the world? Does the great joy of good times in life really make up for that?

I do hope my daughter and her man take in another cat. There are so many cats that need a loving home and they have big hearts and they gave Argo so much after a really rotten start to his life. Argo is so happy and so fully cat in his memorial picture. They could give another cat the wonderful gift they gave Argo.

I think the real reason Argo’s death has left me awake all this past night is because of how close death came to taking my husband from me last June. I can’t help but think every time he hugs me or I snuggle up for a cuddle in bed “He’s still warm. He’s still with me.” I look in the mirror and I see the wrinkles and the marks of aging. Death is stalking me now too. So perhaps poor Argo’s unfortunate passing has served as a reminder I’d rather not have, the reminder of the mortality that is looking me in the face every single day that remains.

God has much to answer for. I have just enough faith to believe that at some point He will, at some point I will understand why.  In the meantime there is nothing to do but embrace the joy that comes with being alive while I can.

Rest in peace kitty. You actually were a perfect little furry saint. We don’t have to make things up about how truly wonderful you were, for a cat.

Then we cross the Rainbow Bridge together….. – GLOBAL SAFARI

Cleaning out the Cabin.

In 2001 we had the rare good fortune to purchase a piece of land near our present home in Alonsa. Every spring, summer and fall we spent as many weekends as possible on our property. Almost every weekend we took a few building materials out and added to our little off grid cabin. By the time we stopped, we had a neat 12 X 8 cabin with an outhouse, a loft bed, a wood stove, a small kitchen, solar powered lighting, and thousands of wonderful memories. We put a formal conservation agreement on the land to protect it for future generations. Because of the fire hazard in letting the prairie land just build up material, in year six we let a neighbour start running their cattle on it. The cattle also preserved the wonderful unbroken original tall grass prairie plants flourishing there. Without cattle, we would have been letting the open space be overtaken by aspen.

We had so much fun at the cabin. Campfires in summer, long hikes, watching the seasons change. Every weekend different wildflowers would be in bloom. We got to experience cycles of nature, drought, and flood, and waves of insect infestations that you just don’t experience when you visit a campground. We discovered miracles like an outbreak of tent caterpillars means a good year for bald faced hornets and limited tree damage in a complete ecosystem. Meanwhile in the city, we observed how the urban forest without bald faced hornets was totally devastated. Northern lights shone many a night and the stars were beyond magnificent in the rural dark. We learned so much about nature, evolution, ecosystems and diversity by living almost every weekend on that land. We also got to know the people in Alonsa.

In 2010 our lives changed dramatically when we sold our city house and moved into a travel trailer. Living in the travel trailer meant we spent less and less time at our tiny cabin. We eventually ended up visiting it once or twice a year to inspect it and check, always intending to go back, but never quite getting around to doing it. We were aging and it was getting harder and harder to do without electricity and walk to an outhouse in the night especially the year a bear took up residence in our yard. There was a savage outbreak of ticks three springs in a row. Much as we loved the place we just kind of stopped using it. We did continue to go out and walk it. We planted trees and we tended to it, but we were just not staying overnight anymore. When we were ready to settle down and give up the travel trailer lifestyle, we first planned on building on that land. Buying our house in town turned out to be a mere fraction of what building would cost. Why should we stay in a rough cabin when we have a nice house 6km away?

When you don’t tend to a cabin, it starts falling apart. Each time we went back we would find something had happened. There were several break ins and each time the result was broken windows, missing stuff and damage. Not all the break ins were humans. Three years ago we arrived to find the body of a poor racoon who had broken in but could not get back out again. His little corpse had rotted and then dehydrated in one corner leaving nothing for us to find but fur and bones. I felt horrible about that. Before he died, he did considerable damage to the ceilings and walls trying to get out. poor raccoon. The following year the 2018 Alonsa tornado barely missed the cabin but did take down all the mature trees around and laid several on the cabin making the area a walking hazard and absolutely ruining any possibility we’d ever want to go back. Astonishingly enough, we discovered the tornado’s edge effect had not only knocked down all the trees, it had picked up and scattered our woodpile.

This spring we decided it was time to admit what was obvious to everyone, and clear out the cabin of all valuables and give up on it. Our plan was to take off the door and let it slowly decompose while acting as a haven for birds and wildlife like so many of the old farm buildings around here. Usually carpenter ants will move in and slowly eat the old building to nothing until if falls into dust after a decade or two of being home to birds and bats and other wildlife. It was a bad year for ticks, again, so we decided to wait for summer. The stroke happened. It was too wet in fall after the big storm and all the rain. This week, the ground frozen and the weather not too bad, we finally started. We are clearing the cabin.

It hurts. So many fond memories. Over the years that we used the place we moved all the silly undignified things I love but weren’t magazine decor for my home out there. Some of the stuff I carried out included a gift of a nameplate in Hebrew my daughter bought us while she was in Israel. There was a canvas with three handprints of one set of my grandchildren. The youngest was a baby that Grandma’s day. The boys are all taller than me now. I found and bought an old plaster wall plaque at a garage sale because it reminded me of a sweet elderly woman from my childhood who showered me with grandmotherly affection. She had an identical matched set on her kitchen walls which I admired as I sat at her table eating homemade cookies and absorbing normality. I put this treasure up on the wall of the cabin because it was an old piece of junk to be ashamed of no matter how many fine memories and good feelings it brought me. There were special books I had put there to read and reread and reread again on hot summer afternoons. (Human thieves never took our books.) There were nature guides for animal tracks and identifying wildflowers. There was also an entire kitchen I used to cook over the fire or on the wood stove. All of it loaded into our truck and hauled home. The work is slow because my husband can’t carry heavy stuff and walking around the downed trees is awkward for both of us. The awkwardness emphasizes how much we have both aged the last thirty years.

Misty loves this job. She spends her time racing about the cabin, sniffing everything. She is reliable off leash, never going further away then 25 metres or so and coming when we call. She accompanies us on each trip back to the truck. She runs the place, leaping over the logs using her canine four wheel drive and exuberant youth with the grace of a white tail deer. Her puppy joy eases the hurt of this change. Coming home to our snug little house we have stuff to sort. Keep, wash, discard, recycle, give away. A box in the basement is filling for our next trip to town and the Salvation Army. Keep, wash, discard, recycle, give away.

I found a special spot for that old plaster bit of junk laden with sweet memory. It’s on my teal cupboard above the joy giving teapot with the butterfly top I found at a thrift shop, with the matching sugar bowl and creamer my daughter gave me, opposite the little bird on my curtain rod and beside the winter scene on a plate I bought on our travels south. Every time I look at that bit of plaster junk I remember that kind woman and I feel like someone just gave me a big comforting hug. I find myself thinking about how nice my life with my husband has been during three fine decades full of joy and exploration and personal growth. Now that I am the old lady, I no longer care about what people think of my home decor. Change is inevitable as life moves on. I have learned that what is important is how you respond to it when it comes and that you really need to accept hugs when you can no matter what a visitor might think of your decor.

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Full Winter Has Arrived

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Full Winter requires a definition for non winter people. Full Winter means that outdoor temperatures stay below freezing at all times. Snow that falls stays on the ground except when it is really cold and it starts sublimating. We actually don’t get a lot of snow in midwinter when it is really cold because it is just too cold to snow. We get the most snow in fall and spring. It’s dark when we wake up and dark when we sit to eat dinner. I bought artificial lights for my poor houseplants or they just won’t make it.

Full Winter means you do not go outside without first donning a heavy insulated winter coat, winter boots, mittens, hat, and something to pull up over your face when the wind blows. The hat is the most important. I like face warmers myself but lots of people use scarves or balaclavas. Exposed skin can freeze in minutes, even seconds in real cold. Indoors, multiple layers, especially long johns and undershirts are required. I add a fleece vest. Most people from the south don’t realize this but jeans are very poor winter gear. The cotton is thin. The wind goes right through and jeans wick off heat when they get wet. I only have jeans on over thermal long underwear. Full Winter means before you come inside you stomp your feet and bang your toes against a door jam to get the snow to fall off. If you track it inside it melts and makes puddles. Also the sweat from your feet makes the inside of your boots damp so you have to make sure they can dry out before the next use. You can always spot a fake winter scene in a movie or TV show by exposed necks, no hat and no pause to stomp away snow in the door. John Snow and his family was not well dressed for winter in spite of the furs.

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Full Winter with small children can be amusing. I recall it taking me twenty minutes to get three little ones dressed, out into the car, safely strapped into safety seats not designed for bulky winter outwear. That’s actually a good thing because full winter also means you start the vehicle and let it warm up for ten or fifteen minutes before you drive anywhere. So you dress yourself, run out, start the vehicle, run back inside and get one child and carry that child to the vehicle, strap the child in, run back and get the next one, strap them in and then get the last one. Whoever invented the remote start deserves sainthood. Oh and I learned it is very important to make little kids use the washroom before you start winter dressing. I recommend delaying toilet training until spring. An accident in a snowsuit is a disaster.

Full Winter means safety in the cold. You do not drive somewhere unless you first make sure someone knows you are going and that someone will notice and miss you if you don’t get where you are supposed to get to. This is especially important on rural roads with low traffic because it is all too easy to disappear into a snow covered ditch and get stuck. Obviously, one also has a fully charged cell phone but some areas where I live have no service. Full Winter also means checking your winter emergency kit for you vehicle in case you get stuck overnight. Aside from some obvious things like a shovel and a scrapper for your window, a good safety kit also includes extra blankets to stay warmer than just your winter gear. (Winter gear is designed for when you are moving about and will not be warm enough to sleep in.) Also a heat source is required. A couple of candles provide enough heat to keep you alive if you have proper winter gear and blankets. Those nifty little chemical break and heat packs for hands and feet are in my safety kit. Also some high energy snacks will help keep away the hypothermic stupids. Hypothermia clouds the brain and results in stupid decisions like trying to walk to get help. In the cold, never leave your stranded vehicle. That is how people die. Cars are easy to spot by passerby searching for you. A person just walks until they get cold and then sits down for a rest and some farmer finds you the following spring when it is time to plow.

Full Winter means your food preferences change. Instead of salads and spicy heat that actually cools, hearty soups and stews sit better. Cold drinks are not as appealing. Tea and coffee are favoured. When you are cold, you have an urge to eat, especially fatty and sweet. Plus it’s such a nuisance to go through the whole procedure of getting dressed that you just do not get out for a walk as easily. The result is you put on weight if you are not careful. Extra vitamin D to chase away the winter blues is a good addition to your life. The sun shines a lot in winter during that very short day and it is lovely but doesn’t warm and most of your skin is covered so you just can’t make enough vitamin D.

Full Winter is not all bad. My cat seeks my company, my lap, my warm bed and he rarely goes outside. In summer he is outside for hours at a time and I can almost forget I have a cat except for making sure he comes in each evening before dark when the coyotes roam the town. He gets bored indoors and so he even invites me to play with him like he’s a kitten again. The dog stays closer as well and actually plays with her ball inside instead of barking at nothing outside. The animals sleep curled in balls often with their tail over their nose.

Full winter is when you can really get to know the wildlife in the area because you can find tracks. This morning I found my deck covered with fresh snow and dozens of bird tracks. I had no idea birds like to walk on my deck. Because the trees are bare you can see the deer and bunnies and catch a glimpse of an illusive cougar or moose. And you don’t need to worry about bears in the bush. The bears all go to sleep. There is a cold beauty to winter. The snow sparkles. The ice tinkles. The night sky is spectacular in a way it never is in summer. The stars twinkle more and the aurora flashes and dances more in the cold. There is a blanket of quiet over everything.

Full Winter is when things are slower on the ranches and farms. The land is asleep. The cattle are nearby and need regular tending twice a day but in between chores, there is time to go to town and sit over coffee and visit or play a game of whist or do some curling. Social life really picks up in the winter. You go to the arena or community centre and hear that stomping to clear the snow away and look over and there is an old friend you did not see all busy summer who can sit and enjoy a cup of coffee and a long chat.

Full Winter means cocooning. You wrap yourself in a warm throw and sit in a rocking chair (assuming the cat lets you take his seat) to watch TV or do a little handicraft. I like to read the seed catalogue. My garden is never so perfect as when the seed catalogue arrives and I am planning for spring. There is a special pleasure that comes from being warm under your blankets in bed. You fall asleep to the sound of the furnace kicking in while outside the wind is howling. Cozy is the word I think of then. Cozy can be very nice.

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Our Weird Rock.

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We were out walking and we both noticed a round granite rock. It’s very unusual to find a round granite rock that is also rough and grooved on the surface. Glaciers can move and grind rocks but normally the result is smooth since glaciers act like natural rock polishers. Rocks smoothed by water tend to be more flat and oval. When we get home we washed the rock off and I noticed some black markings on one side in the grooved area. I tried washing the black off with a toothbrush but it would not come off. The rock is full of little flecks of white, we presume silica and some red/gold flecks which look to be iron. As we examined it, we both began to think the same thing. Maybe this is not an ordinary rock. Maybe it’s a meteorite. With that thought in mind we went on line to try to find something that would let us identify it.

Dick used the water displacement method to figure out the density. Iron meteorites are normally much heavier than earth rocks like granite. Our rock’s density is a bit on the light side but in the normal range for granite. Meteorites usually have a lot of iron and are often able to attract a magnet.  Our rock is very mildly magnetic. It pulls a compass needle toward it. The magnets we have are not strong and they don’t “stick” but you can feel there is a pull between the rock and a magnet. Of course there are earth rocks that do that too.

There are natural rock meteorites, left over from when a planet crashed in Earth and the result turned the Earth molten and created the moon. That type has lower density compared to iron meteorites. There are also stony meteorites called carbonaceous chondrites. These have carbon-bearing matter: elemental carbon, nano diamonds, abiotic organic compounds, fullerenes, and other rare, carbon forms. Carbon-bearing matter from meteorites are thought to be the very beginning of the tree of life. So perhaps what we found is a carbonaceous chrondite. Our rock is 2.4 grams per centimetre cubed or about the range of both carbonaceous chondrites meteorites or common earth rocks like granite.

We dragged out the stereo microscope to have a really close look at the surface. There are some perfectly round tiny nodules visible under a magnifying glass that are tinted green. There are multiple very small perfect half cups of both the white and greenish material as if nodules melted open. Embedded in the rusty coloured material are tiny perfect spheres of black. There are many small, bright metallic flakes over the entire surface. Our rock also does not have the typical exterior melted on look of a meteorite. Still there is that black smudge on one side where the surface has some shallow grooves. Under the microscope it looks like black melted rock material but only deep in the grooves so maybe it is a worn meteorite. On the other hand, you can find black with nodules like that from volcano rocks that formed deep in the earth. Maybe it’s just an interesting earth rock.

So what is it? We are asking some of our friends in the astronomy field. We could spend some money and send it off to be sampled by professionals. I’m not sure I want to hear them say, nope, just an earth rock. It’s more fun to hold it in our hands and think, of such stuff was life likely started in our planet. We shall see. Meantime we had a nice distraction from our day to day cares in the form of a round rock on our path on a country road. We used that to learn a lot about meteorites. We had fun dragging out the old stereo microscope we haven’t used in years. Even if it turns out our rock is just a funny round earth rock, we are glad we found it.

For you, O LORD, have made me glad by your work; at the works of your hands I sing for joy. Psalm 92:4

Blessed are you Lord our God, King of the Universe, who makes the works of creation.

Good Doctors are Wonderful!

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We walked in to see the new family doctor for the second time. It was wonderful! I really like this new family doctor we have. This doctor heard us out, made careful notes and immediately agreed it was time to start getting off all the extra blood pressure meds. We did not have to argue or plead.  We now have a plan to reduce the amlodipine by half for two weeks and then eliminate it completely for two weeks. If his blood pressure stays in a good range we can then try stopping the second of the three drugs, hydrochlorothiazide. If his blood pressure starts back up again, we go in and reevaluate. I can’t say how delighted I am because while the dissection was initially the worst part of all this, the side effects from the drugs have more recently become the worst part of his life.

The order of the reduction which the doctor recommended was different from the one I thought we should move in but we will follow the doctor’s advice since, well, he’s the doctor. He explained why he was recommending the order he did and it made sense. It was immediately apparent he knew a lot more than me. He explained why he thought we need to continue with the blood thinners for three more months and it made sense so we will do that too. Unlike the previous doctor, he told us the blood test results.

Getting rid of the atorvastatin last week has already made a remarkable improvement in our quality of life. It’s not fun living with horrific thigh and back cramps and terrible muscle pain. It’s so hard as a wife to see your husband suffer and be unable to do anything. I am very hopeful that getting rid of at least one of the blood pressure drugs will help with the lack of stamina, dizzy spells, swollen ankles, and getting spots before the eyes on standing. The dog will be happier too if we can begin to enjoy our regular long walks again without the having to stop to sit and rest. As a bonus, we are getting referred to a new neurologist who is not so authoritarian and patriarchal in his patient interactive style. We are assured this one will better suit our personalities. I have no doubt about the skill of the previous doctor but he obviously has real issues with patients who ask questions. What a pleasure to be teated as intelligent adult partners in our care whose opinions and words count.

A good doctor is worth his or her weight in gold. I think we have found a 24K one.

 

 

End of the Season

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Frost warnings are up tonight and the forecast for a few days from now keeps alternating between snow and rain. It has been a poor year due to the summer drought but a bit of rain and the last season frost holding off longer than usual gave the garden a teeny boost at the end.

In preparation for the possibility of frost, I picked my tomato plants clean of all tomatoes and moved them into the basement to finish ripening. I also pulled up the last of the onions, beets, carrots, and cucumbers. I dug up the potatoes and cleaned off the pepper plants. I cut the last of the herbs. The house is full of the smell of rosemary and thyme coming from the dehydrator.  We are eating sauces and salsa’s from fresh tomatoes. We are still enjoying the sweet pleasure of popping whole cherry tomatoes like candies.

The end of the garden season is always a combined relief and a time for sadness and reflection. The garden is a lot of work and while it is mostly pleasurable work, it is still work. It’s nice to have a break from it. I have made my notes for next spring and I collected and dried seeds for next year. Now is the time to get to those indoor chores that have been neglected. There are still plenty of preparations before the deep cold. After last of the produce was safe from the frost, I finally fixed a light switch that has been broken since July.

Life runs in cycles and seasons. Life is a cycle of blessings.

Thank you, Master of the Universe for allowing me to enjoy another full summer of gardening and the opportunity to enjoy food from my own garden, grown and prepared with my own hands.