Tag Archives: travel

Arches National Park

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View back into the Moab canyon and main highway below as we climbed up into the park.

There are certain places in America that have been in so many movies and visited by so many people, that they become iconic symbols of eras and states. Arches National Park is one of those places. It is also almost required that if you are any kind of RVer you get to Arches. I have not read an RVer blog yet where someone did not get to Arches or planned on it. And so I arrived in Moab with a great sense of anticipation. Arches was our first destination. I was very glad we decided to stay in a nice campground in Moab and drive into the park leaving the trailer behind. The entrance into Arches is up several steep and winding curves. I’m not sure my truck would have made it pulling that trailer. There is also no room to pass so no crawling along in low gear. The drive was spectacular and breathtaking.

Visiting Arches means you can drive up to some of the major sites by this lovely freshly repaved road. You can park and then walk to overlooks or take the longer trails as you wish. The weather was absolutely perfect for us. It was clear, sunny, about 60F (10C) with a light breeze. We had to leave the dogs in the truck because dogs are not allowed on any trails. This restricted us to places where we could see the truck and be able to leave the windows open but it was cool enough that the dogs would not get overheated. I would very strongly advise not taking dogs along if you don’t have this kind of weather.

We started at the visitor centre which was very well done. There was a short movie about the geology and many displays of how the arches formed. We enjoyed the background information. We made sure our water bottles were full and that we used the washrooms. We were warned that due to the ongoing renovations there are no outhouses on the way. Also part the park where the campground is, was completely closed.

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The start of the drive included these stunning solid walls of rock. You have to stay on the roads and trails but these types of walls exist all around Moab including some outside the national parks. We saw rock climbers of various sorts outside the park walls. If I were younger and stronger I suspect I would be among them.

We first really spectacular site we saw was the balancing rock. There is a short trail that allows you to walk all the way around and see it from all sides. I couldn’t help but feel a certain affinity for the balancing rock. It kind of parallels certain parts of my life where a lot of deliberate balancing was required to stay upright. Life is much easier now, being retired with all the kids grown up.

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And then there were arches! This might sound silly but in all the pictures I have seen of the arches I never got a proper perspective on how huge these things are! They are enormous several stories high and stunningly beautiful in person. No picture can convey the grandeur and beauty. There was one place where we could, after a short steep walk, get right up underneath the arches and still monitor the truck and dogs while we did. I was so drawn I almost ran.

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Dick could not resist getting right under the arch and taking pictures of a precarious looking boulder as big as our truck that looked like it could fall out at any time.

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I took this picture of Dick and another man who were both photographing the underside of the arch for perspective. This allows you to get a feel for just how huge the arches are.

We spent about three and a half hours viewing the arches before making the trip back down to the visitor centre for an overdue bathroom break. I was very glad we did not chose to go on Thanksgiving Day itself. We drove by the gate to Arches on our way to our next adventure in Canyonlands Thanksgiving Day and we passed a long and slow moving line at the entrance gate going from the gate all the way back to the highway. I would strongly advise avoiding the place on any holiday.

I can now cross the Arches National Park in Utah off my bucket list. I am very glad I came and it was well worth the trip.

 

 

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Traveling To Moab

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We left Scipio after getting our trailer repaired and stopped for the night in Salina. There was a neat little campground there called Butch Cassidy RV Park. The WIFI did not work beyond some very small tight pull through spots. Aside from that it was a good place. They had two pet goats wandering about and watching Misty see goats for the first time was hilarious. We left refreshed and ready for the road. Just in case you are every in the area Route 50 is a very easy drive with no surprises, steep hills or other issues.

The drive from Salina to Moab was another story. In spite of it being an interstate, there were several very steep hills going up between  valleys. Our truck was able to handle all but one. It was so steep that I had to pull over to let the tranny cool and then finish the last quarter mile of the climb with my truck in low, four wheel drive low and crawl along on the shoulder at a 3mph. Fortunately for us that seems to happen a lot because the shoulder was clear and a highway patrol whizzed by without a sideways glance at us. If I ever move to the mountains I’ll need to buy a more powerful truck. My poor F150 is perfectly fine out on the prairie but not on mountain roads. There was on really harrowing 6%, 6 miles of downhill grade with many sharp curves that required dropping to 40 mph and a lot of concentration for me. I did it, but with lots of time in low gear and my brake pads were gleaming and clean when we took a break at the bottom.

The trail has many rest stops and viewing areas. We stopped at Castle Valley. The view was spectacular and a welcome start to our Moab area look. We made some guesses about what might account for the spectacular formations. We later learned this had once been an ocean. In fact there have been 27 times this area has been inundated by an ocean.

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We continued our trip in and arrived at Moab about 5:00pm. The first campground we were originally thinking of staying at was gone. We found another Spanish Trail RV Park nearby that was very reasonable for Moab at $30/night. We registered for a week and settled in. What a spectacular view we have!

 

Storm Stayed

HighwayMapDick finished up his conference in a fine mood. I was watching the forecast because a storm was coming in. The weatherman said snow would start 11:00am Friday morning. It would end before midnight followed by some wind. Dick was finished at 12:30pm. I decided to pass the time by making fresh bread and preparing a nice dinner. Our plan was to leave the next morning. Men plan, God laughs. He had a good chuckle that day. Promptly at 11:00am the snow started. By the time I went to pick up Dick the roads were icy and a real mess even in town.

A young man, a student, attending the conference caught a lift with us to our end of town where he was supposed to catch a Greyhound bus to Denver. To save money the student had been staying in a tent in the same campground as us so we were giving him lifts back and forth. Due to the imminent wet snow he had taken his tent down and packed everything into his back pack. Now his bus was delayed and he literally had everything he owned on his back. So we had a guest for dinner.

We monitored the continuing deterioration of the highways by the progress of his bus. Finally, we headed over to the bus station and dropped him off at 7:44pm. Just before I went to sleep the highways map showed conditions so dangerous that sections of the highway were now closed.

We are near the interstate and I was awoken about 1:00am by a weird quiet. I peeked out the window and saw rows and rows and rows of semis on the side of the highway. A check of the map showed everything was red, closed, for miles in all directions. The back end of the cold front moved past shortly afterward with intense rocking winds that made our trailer sway alarmingly.

We woke up ready to get on the road. We had a nice breakfast, showered and packed everything up. The map said the highways would open between 10:30am and 12:30pm. Due to the cold meaning the furnace ran a lot overnight, we had an empty propane tank. We decided to head into the town and get that filled before we left. While we were doing that, we ended up talking to several of the locals about the road conditions. Everyone said we should not head out as soon as the highways opened. One man in particular was adamant. The roads might open at 10:30am as we hoped but there was no way the highway would be safe for us pulling a trailer. He strongly advised us to wait a day.

We had some time to kill so we left the store and took the dogs for one last romp at the dog park. In the dog park we got the same advice. Wait. On our way back to the campground we could see lines and lines and line of semis. Every back street, parking lot and empty space had a semi parked there. Among the semis were a few recreational vehicles, buses with passengers and weaving in and out with flashing lights, highway patrol. We looked at the highways map one more time and it said the road was open going west, closed going east and in several places there were high winds with an extreme rollover danger. Semis began pulling out of Laramie to head west in long lines. I went and paid for another night instead.

I have always made it a policy to follow the advice of the locals. If they say something is dangerous, I assume they are right and I listen. We had a nice quiet day of fixing items and relaxing and watching TV. About 5:00pm, I checked the highways map again. A huge exclamation mark brought up a message saying a vehicle had been blown over and caused a multi-car pile up and the highway was now closed to west bound traffic. That could have been us. I am so glad we stayed put. The highways map now shows almost all green. A few spots are orange and there are only two black ice warnings. Hopefully, we’ll get up and find the highway all green and be on our way early in the morning. If not, well there are worse things than spending another say in a safe campground with full services, good WIFI and cable.

Our latest trip south.

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Leaving Manitoba to drive south in winter is a dicey affair. No matter what the weather forecast says, you are bound to be surprised. This trip was no exception. We awoke on the 12th, our scheduled departure date, to find it was snowing. And it kept right on snowing right until we got over the US border. This meant a trip that would normally take about three hours took five. We paused for a break in McCreary, Neepawa and Brandon in order to deal with issues like a puppy who needed a walk and bathroom breaks. By the time we got to Brandon I was thoroughly chilled in spite of my winter outerwear and thermal underwear. Hot coffee never tasted so good!

Our original destination was a campground in Dickinson ND. Unfortunately we found ourselves only at Minot ND when darkness fell with blowing snow and nasty cold winds. We detoured off to Swenson’s RV repair and campground.  Exhausted and cold we arrived after the office had closed and we couldn’t find the campground host. I’m not sure why because when we rolled out there was a huge sign by the first campsite near the door. We rolled into an open pull through, plugged in the electric and settled in. The temperature was -17C (1F) and forecast to drop to -22C (-8F). The furnace ran without a pause all night and we had two electric heaters and our little electric countertop oven open and on. We snuggled under our electric blanket which was set on the highest level. We were barely warm enough. I was so grateful Swenson’s was open! We would never have made it through the night with just propane heat from the furnace.

Morning dawned bright and early. Since we fell asleep by about 8:00pm we were up at 5:00am. We were off to Dickinson. I felt really bad because there was no where to leave an envelope with our payment. We got to Dickinson very early and gained an hour due to the change to Mountain time. We stopped for breakfast at MacDonald’s and a cup of hot coffee never tasted so good. First thing I did was send the folks at Swenson’s an email to tell them we had been there and needed to pay them. After some searching I found a campground in Rapid City that was not only open, but in an “above freezing daytime” forecast zone. We decided to continue on.

That long long long stretch between Dickinson ND and Rapid City SD seemed like it would never end. We did see antelope, jackrabbits, mules deer, flocks and Canada geese, partridges, and a pheasant. That helped break up the trip. We made a few stops at bleak windy cold roadside stops. Somewhere along the way we noticed we had left the snow behind and we were relieved.

Misty had been very well behaved the entire trip. She either slept or followed what was going on outside with great interest. About an hour and half from our destination she had just had enough. She started puppy crying and howling and barking at us. If she could  have talked I’m sure she would have said “When are we going to get there??? How much farther do we have to go??? I want to go HOME!!!” In spite of two more breaks and a surprise chewy, offers of food and water, she remained inconsolable. I felt really bad for her but there was nothing to do but push on. Eventually she put her head down where Dick could reach and he rubbed her ears and talked to her and she settled enough to finish the last part of the trip quietly.

We pulled into Happy Holiday Resort after dark and we were warmly welcomed by the staff there. I can’t describe how nice it is to arrive at a campground exhausted, cold, hungry, and we welcomed with a cheerful attitude and a perfect campsite. I had some pre-made hot chilli and I made some rice. While the rice cooked we went for a nice long walk with the dogs. We all fell asleep early again.

In the morning I was awoken by steady dripping. It was already above freezing and all the accumulated snow and ice was beginning to melt. By the time we finished making breakfast, the solar panel’s regulator was humming. The sun was strong enough and the ice had melted enough that the panels were actually charging again. After breakfast I went to the campground shower and enjoyed a long hot shower. It was wonderful to feel clean and warm again. Our hosts refilled the propane tank we emptied overnight in Minot for a modest $18. We then took the dogs for another nice long walk. Because of skipping Dickinson and driving so far the second day out we found ourselves a day ahead of schedule. The campground was so pleasant we paid for a second night. The WIFI was really good and among other things we settled with Swenson’s for our surprise stay. I had a nice correspondence via email with the staff there I am thinking we will go by again if we can in future.

On the way out, we went by Mount Rushmore. We had a little misadventure on the way in because the highway was so steep on the last two miles that we could only climb with the truck on low four wheel drive and first gear at a crawl. That was harrowing but we made it. (Note to others, take the southern route in. It is much less steep.) We had been at Mount Rushmore many years before but because we spent so much time at the Crazy Horse exhibit we had just stopped by the roadside for a few minutes and then continued. This trip we paid our $5 fe and went in and looked at the displays and the museum. We took a selfie to prove we had been there. I can’t say I like how I look in the picture but it is a good shot of Hubby Dearest. The sunshine was such a pleasure! We then continued on into Wyoming.

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The trip to Wyoming was uneventful. Our plan was to stay in a free campsite in a place called Wheatland. We go there early enough we decided to push on through to Laramie. We had let the KOA know we might be a day early and so they were prepared. We decided not to take a recommended shortcut via highway 34 because the map had a mountain pass on it. We weren’t sure about how high the pass was, how our trailer would manage or the weather as we had a strong north wind blowing up to 60 km/hr (40mph). We had the wind to our back on the interstate and so the trip into Cheyenne was easy. I hardly even had to put my foot on the gas. The uphills were ridiculously easy with the wind. The trip from Cheyenne to Laramie was really difficult even though it was on an interstate. It seemed like all we did was climb and climb against a cross wind and a few times I could barely hit 60km/h (40m/h).

We finally crawled into the Laramie KOA just before 6:00pm. We checked in and picked up some packages that we had arranged to mail ahead and made ourselves at home. I was shaking and feeling light headed and numb. I think I was reacting to going from 1200ft in Manitoba to 7200ft in Laramie with only two days acclimatizing at 3200ft in South Dakota. We went to bed early again and then after another delightful hot shower we did some grocery shopping. Dick’s conference registration was at 4:30pm and they served all kinds of sushi as the welcome snack. YUM!

This KOA campground is fine. One thing it has which I really appreciate is a fenced dog play area big enough for Misty to go a flat out run. We have been visiting it several times a day. The traffic noice is a bit much as we are right near the interstate but it is temporary. I have plenty to do.

We are set to stay a week in Laramie. In addition to the major repair of getting our hot water heater unit in, I made arrangements to get the truck a slightly over due tune up and finally fix the slow leak in the tranny. Dick meanwhile is attending a conference. He is having a blast while I entertain the dogs and get stuff done.

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On the Road Again

Hubby dearest and I are getting ready to depart the cold snowy north and head to warmer climes. We have been extremely fortunate to be able to travel from Canada in winter to the USA since the winter of 2010/11. This means we are about to embark on our seventh year of missing full winter. We get to miss the worst of the terrible cold winters and walk beaches instead. A few days ago, I was feeling very much not ready to leave my cosy home and head south. The more time and energy I spend on in/with my little house, the more attached I get and the less the urge to wander consumes me. Fortunately for my desire to get ready this happened today.

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In spite of how much I am going to miss my friends and family there is nothing like 20cm of heavy wet snow to make you start lusting after some beach, somewhere.

Yesterday we cleared the garage and put most of the stuff in the truck. A few larger items (like the lawn mower) we moved into the basement. We stowed our bikes in the truck and got the canoe strapped on top. I checked, fixed, reprogrammed and tested our security cams and alarm system. We installed a second sump pump, just in case. Last year it cost us a small fortune to heat the house enough so the basement didn’t freeze while we were gone. This year, we installed a new electronic thermostat that can be set as low as -4.5C in the basement and we disconnected the upstairs thermostat. We had new vents installed in the basement to suck air in and put air out only in the basement for the winter and Dick has built wooden block things to go over the upstairs vents. We also added an oil filled space heater with the freeze setting just in case something happens and we need back up heat. Hopefully this will save us a lot of heating costs without freezing up our basement.

We covered the top of the septic tank with insulation just in case there isn’t enough snow to cover and insulate it. You might not think that could possibly be a problem given the snow we had today but it often can be up here at the 51st parallel. If we get a prolonged period of -40C(-40F) weather, the snow will begin sublimating directly into the air and slowly vanish. It will be too cold for more snow to fall. Add a little wind and the septic tank could end up exposed just when it needs snow cover the most. A lot of people don’t get that really cold weather means less and less snow but it is so. (Consider yourself as having been blessed if you have never experienced this.)

We also have done stuff like get the house insurance up to date, alert credit card companies we are going, dropped off keys with the two neighbours and told the rest we are going so the whole town can watch our house. We will have our computers, my jewelry, and almost all of our tools with us, so there isn’t a lot left behind to steal but between the alarm system, the video surveillance, our neighbours and our alarm system we are hopeful we will come back to an intact home. If we don’t, well that is what insurance and good neighbours are for. My stomach flutters but we just can’t take the stick house with us.

We have also been getting all the other stuff ready. This means passports, medical insurance for travel, informing the government we are going so we still have health care when we get, getting the telephone and internet turned off, and letting the credit card companies and banks know we are leaving, and making sure the paperwork on the pets health checks and shots are handy for the border. I also renewed our KOA membership, our CAA, and our Pilot/Flying J cards.

Our plans are, as usual, mostly “we’ll see”. Dick will be attending a conference in Laramie Wyoming for one week. That is our only fixed date thing. From there we plan to go back a bit north and then west to Salt Lake city and then down the east side of Utah with a nice long stopover in Moab. I am really looking forward to seeing the National Parks in that area. Utah is the only state in the lower 48 we have never visited yet. From there we will cross northern New Mexico (maybe see some pueblos?), Texas, hug along Oklahoma’s southern border to see more of the state we fell in love with last spring, and then on to Florida and our winter home. The westward swing will make it an extra long trip but it will be another grand adventure for us.

We get asked about “camping” in the trailer in this weather. It’s not fun. It’s cold. We bundle up warmly and use a lot of propane for the furnace and we really appreciate our electric blanket, if we have a power hook up. We have found campgrounds open year round for the entire trip to warmer climes beginning in Minot, ND. The trailer has been long since drained of water. We will have to use the campground washrooms and showers until we get far enough south to allow us to get the water system going again. To do that, we need temperatures to only drop 2 or 3 degrees below freezing at night and then be up above freezing during the day. Checking the weather in both Laramie WY and Moab UT, it appears that will likely mean no water in the trailer until we get to Moab. Aside from need to use campground facilities for shower and other stuff, this means cooking and doing dishes can be problematic. I have some frozen quickie meals ready for the trip.

And so we will be off soon, ‘God willing and the creek don’t rise’, as they say down south. We will shortly transform from stick house people back to trailer people living  full-time in our trailer. I keep thinking of things that can go wrong or things that will prevent us from going. Considering these, my stomach is a flutter and I feel the stress.   The weather forecast is excellent. Will it hold? Our health is fine today. Will we get sick and have to stay behind? Will one of us trip and break a leg preventing our departure? Our truck maintenance and trailer maintenance is complete and up to date. Will something break down anyway? Will the cat go into hiding and delay us for a day as he has in the past? The little doubt and worry hamsters are running over time in my head.

We leave early Wednesday morning if all goes well. I hope you’ll join me on our latest grand adventure as tumbling tumbleweeds. And if you have tips for things to do and stuff to see, please let me know. I’d love to hear.

 

Migration Home Twelfth Stop Sisseton South Dakota and then home.

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We left Sioux City north and drove up I29. This has to be the most boring stretch of highway in North America. Miles and miles and miles of nothing. We had some luck in the city of Sioux Falls. We got a recommendation from a store clerk in Staples for a grocery store big on ethnic food. We arrived to find enough kosher-for-passover items that we were able to stock up for the whole eight days. On arrival in Sisseton the folks at Camp Dakota were welcoming as they had been last year and we set up. Our host for tomorrow’s visit, Sister Patrice Colette met us and we had dinner at the nearby Casino. Profits from the Casino go right back into the tribe including the school we were going to be presenting at. We had an excellent meal and turned in early. Sister was going to be picking us up at 6:30am. We fell asleep to the sound of enormous flocks of starlings and black birds feasting on the remnants of last year’s corn crop in the adjacent field.

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The school we were going to visit is the Tiospa Zina Tribal School of the Sisseton-Wahpeton Dakota Reservation. Last year we presented to the class and then got a tour of the band offices. This year we spent the entire school day participating and visiting. This was our second stop as visiting scientists and much as I enjoyed the first visit last year, this one went even better. Our day started out with breakfast at the school. All students get a nutritious start to their day. Breakfast was scrambled egg omelet with cheese filling, bacon (which we skipped), vegetables and fruit. Cereal was available, as was milk, but not as the main item and not many kids picked those for breakfast.

After breakfast we attended a ceremony to start the academic day. This included a drum circle and songs in Dakota. I saw a lot of older students watching out for and caring for younger students. Our conference was interrupted by a break for school awards for excellent work, for personal improvement, for good attendance an to announce successes students had outside the school. Students not only got nice little printed certificates. They got something I never got in school, which was nice crisp new bills as cash awards. There was strong emphasis on personal responsibility, duty to the tribe and community as a whole and respect for elders and each other in the ceremony. Everyone helped clear up when the award ceremony was finished.

Officially we were there as keynote speakers for a science conference. The student prepared in advance and then I presented on sea turtles, their embryology, evolution, the dangers they face and how people can help them. Hubby dearest presented his latest research on the original of life in our universe and slipped in a talk about the age of the universe and powers of ten. We closed off our presentations by giving the students chunks of marine fossils in soft sandstone. Their objective was to break out a fossil and use Google and some books to identify what the fossil was. And they succeeded. We have done many of these classroom visits to schools over the years. In this school we were delighted to find curious minds, intense interest, and well thought out questions. We were not just questioned about the science itself. We were questioned about important practical things like how do you balance work and family and why did we become scientists. We were not once subjected to snarky misbehaviour or nasty background tomfoolery that has happened to us in other schools.

We learned a lot too, getting a glimpse into the life of students at the tribal school. Manitoba already has powerful connections to this reserve because they are related to the Dakota people on the reserve south of Portage LaPrairie and many of the students have family in Canada that come and visit them or they come and visit in South Dakota. The Manitoba connections made us feel right at home.

We left Sisseton feeling very positive and began the last leg of our journey. We made a brief stop in Fargo to buy lefse. Lefse is a traditional food of my father’s Scandinavian ancestors, far better than lutefisk and it is not readily available in stores. Additionally, making it from scratch produces a lot of smoke so I had to give up doing it myself due to my asthma.  At Freddy’s we picked up enough fresh frozen to last us and our family members to the next trip to North Dakota.

Our original plan was to stop at a state park on the border with Canada. I had checked the webpage and it said the campground was open. I called the park and I got an answering machine message that cheerfully declared the campground was open and if we needed fresh water we could get it at the ranger station. When we arrived it was different story. As it turned out, the only camping available was walk in winter camping and the roads and campsites were under too much snow to even think of driving in with a truck and trailer. We were subjected to a particularly stupid bureaucrat/ranger who seemed to think we were the stupid ones for not knowing all that in spite of what their message said. I politely suggested the message be changed to better reflect reality. Each time I said that, I was told why I was so stupid for thinking I could get the camper into the park in March. Eventually we gave up and left, muttering imprecations about how government seems to attract a larger proportion of particularly stupid people as employees than other organizations.

Home

We were about three and a half hours from home and it was 3:00pm. We got waved through at the border by the cheerful guard. We stopped to stock up on groceries in the Winkler just over the border. We then just kept driving. We pulled into our driveway at our little house on the northern prairie. To our relief the driveway had been thoughtfully cleared of ice and snowdrifts by a neighbour for our return. It was SO good to be home. We found our house exactly as we had left it except for some extra cobwebs. Our migration was complete.

According to Google we traveled over 2300 miles. If we had driven nonstop, the trip would have taken a mere 37 hours. We took 35 days, most days did not drive more than three hours and stayed for at least two days at each stop. It was easily our best trip yet! The birds were even slower than us. It was two more weeks before the birds we left in South Dakota showed up. They were the smart ones. There was a blizzard between our arrival home and their return to the north.

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Migration Home: Eleventh Stop Sioux City North KOA South Dakota

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Our next drive was a longer one. We were now far enough north that it made sense to put in a longer drive and make some progress. There were no more government associated campground to go to. We were limited to a very few private ones that are opened year around. We decided we were going to check out a state park in South Dakota that was supposedly open. We have done that before and arrived to find that while the campground is technically open in March, there is no running water or dump site and the campsites are under several feet of snow. Our original plan was to drive to this state park and if it was unsuitable continue on to the Sioux City North KOA. There just one small problem. I misread the map and mixed up Sioux City North and Sioux Falls and the KOA came up first. We were both tired. We decided that since this KOA is a familiar and comfortable place, one that we stop at practically every trip, we would just turn in. We would try out the state park the next night. When we checked in, we discovered we had a $25 credit with KOA for our first night. We had also stopped at this particular KOA enough times to have earned a second free night on their own private promotional special. It worked out to $12 for two nights in a full service campsite and it just too tempting to turn down. We decided to skip the state park altogether.

We had a quiet two days. I spent most of my time preparing my talk for our next stop. We had both been invited to speak at Tiospa Zina Tribal School in Sisseton South Dakota. We had emails going back and forth with our host about content and preparations for our visit. We took one long walk on the walk past the campground because the weather was lovely. We had some friends call to announce they would come to visit us for Passover in Alonsa. It was a delightful treat to hear from them and we were happy about having company for Passover. I began planning putting on a full seder. This did leave us with the question of where to get enough Passover supplies to put on decent seder on the trip between here and home. There are not exactly a lot of Jews in North and South Dakota and rural Manitoba. Too bad we hadn’t known one day before as we drove right past Omaha, Nebraska, which is something of a kosher food grand central station. Much of the kosher beef used in New York comes out of a facility in Omaha.

We pulled out after two days. I had my presentation prepared and we set out for Sisseton SD, still wondering where we might find Kosher food for our Passover meal.

Here is my review of the Sioux City North KOA:

One of the few campground open year round in the north this is a standard KOA with a better than usual store. We seem to always end up back here going north or south from Canada. WIFI is excellent. staff are wonderful. They have specials to encourage people to return. You can buy propane and the laundry is clean and big. Some permanent residents but it’s neat and clean. A better than average KOA. Office closes at 6:00pm promptly. This KOA is in town at the edge of north Sioux City and right off the interstate so traffic and city noise is a problem.

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